BATTLE LEADERSHIP ADOLF VON SCHELL PDF

January 1, Robert Quick read at only 95 pages even taking notes. Lots of interesting first hand anecdotes as this German officer drew upon his experiences in the First World War German army to talk small unit command to his classmates in The Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia in Von Schell would return to Germany and his army career, serving in several command positions during the war until killed in December as a Lieutenant General. January 1, Arron Ruston Very interesting Very interesting view of the psychology effects of war but more so the men of war. Intriguing for any aspiring leader.

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January 1, Robert Quick read at only 95 pages even taking notes. Lots of interesting first hand anecdotes as this German officer drew upon his experiences in the First World War German army to talk small unit command to his classmates in The Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia in Von Schell would return to Germany and his army career, serving in several command positions during the war until killed in December as a Lieutenant General.

January 1, Arron Ruston Very interesting Very interesting view of the psychology effects of war but more so the men of war. Intriguing for any aspiring leader. January 1, Nicholas Mock Good ReadHelped bolster those lessons taught at the basic level of military leadership.

January 1, Rob Wilensky Short, easy to digest, and essential to aspiring leaders. I read this about 15 years ago and have consistently referenced the lessons. January 1, David Farrell Good book; short read. The book was largely wr Good book; short read. The book was largely written in a narrative format and was captured primarily from lectures von Schell gave to the U. The book is a powerful application of lessons learned from personal experiences at the tactical level and applied to the greater areas of military science and defense policy.

Von Schell described the transformation of individuals and collective units as they progressed from personnel acquisition by the Army, initial training and educations courses to military exercises and ultimately deployment to combat.

Von Schell drew from combat examples during German campaigns on the western front against France, the southern front against Italy, and the eastern front against Russians. His main focus was on the actions and factors that impacted the decisions of tactical combat leaders at the platoon, company, battalion, regimental and division levels in both offensive and defensive operations.

To summarize, von Schell emphasized the following factors for effective combat leadership: character, psychology, personal courage; battlefield positioning; information processing, mission orders and communications; and dealing with complexity and uncertainty. For character, psychology, and personal courage, von Schell identified that it is impossible to know how soldiers and leaders would react when they first encountered combat.

Training and drills, while they were effective for mechanical warfighting skills and processes, did not enable a deeper look into the psychology of individual men and recommend appropriate actions to take when confronted with the anticipation and fear of initial combat.

Leaders used a mixture of humor, courage, information dissemination, storytelling, etc. Physical presence was a key command and control and leadership decision during combat. Mission success depended on being able to quickly see and maneuver to take advantage of opportunities or plug gaps once contact was gained with the enemy.

If a leader chose to position themselves with the lead element during an attack, it was likely that they would become occupied with individual tasks associated with fire and maneuver and their physical exposure limited their ability to see their entire formation main and supporting efforts.

After multiple engagements, leaders learned to demonstrate their physical courage in other ways outside of battle and then position themselves on the battlefield in more central locations to influence the outcome by controlling supporting efforts such as machine guns and artillery and follow on maneuver forces. The freedom of physical positioning was only achieved through effective delegation of combat leadership tasks to the lead elements officers and non-commissioned officers.

Not as good as I had hoped. Give them something active to do. The commanders job is to inspire confidence. If you can do this, then half the battle is already won. The analysis done by the Author on the Psychology of soldiers and officers during the first world war can be applied to any sort of leadership to some extend. The Author brings interesting stories from his own experience in the Russian front putting deep understanding of the humanitarian factor in such frightening war. This is unusual book to me and enjoyed reading it January 1, Matt As a combat veteran, I can personally attest to the truth and accuracy in this book.

Adolf Von Schell does a very good job of using real-world examples, most of them personal experiences, to illustrate key lessons. The main idea is that peacetime training is different than war, and the lessons are mostly concerned with how to make peacetime training more effective.

When reading this book, you must remember that it was written just after WW1, so it is tactically outdated. That being said, there a As a combat veteran, I can personally attest to the truth and accuracy in this book. That being said, there are timeless pieces of knowledge that anyone interested in leading troops into combat should know.

January 1, J. January 1, Adrien Respite with good military wisdom and stories of German Officership in the first World War, Battle Leadership is a practical resource for insight into the effect of war on the human dimension. Easy to read --in total it may take around three to four hours. His insights into the nature of battle and small unit leadership are second to none. A book to be re-read multiple times as experience in the military increases. January 1, Wachlin Hotmail This book discusses how to lead men in combat.

It discusses how to handle different personalities, how to prepare your troops psychologically for combat and how to instill confidence in them. It is written by a World War I German infantry officer. There are some really prescient comments in the final two Chapters about the limits in the American military model of the interwar period.

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Battle Leadership

A veteran of the First World War, he fought throughout the conflict on all of the fronts from until the Armistice in Following the war he was retained in the German military and attended the Fort Benning Infantry School course, graduating in the Advanced Class of During his time there he was asked to provide his insights into the leader in a combat environment as the level of experience within the US Army was relatively small at the time. What resulted was an insightful series of short papers on varying facets of the impact of the combat environment on both the leader and the soldier. He emphasizes throughout the fundamental differences between a peacetime training environment and the actual realities of combat. Thus, he stresses the absolute critical need for as much realism as possible when training. Specifically, he talks about the need for the leader to both make and to seen to make decisions that meet the demands of the commanders intent - decentralized command.

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