DEMODICOSIS IN DOGS PDF

Canine Demodicosis What are Demodex mites? And what is demodicosis? Demodex spp. For the vast majority of dogs, these mites never cause a problem. However in some instances, mite populations become huge resulting in inflammation and clinical disease. This disease is called demodicosis.

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Share this: 3 min read Mange demodicosis is an inflammatory disease in dogs caused by the Demodex mite. When the number of mites inhabiting the hair follicles and skin of a dog rapidly increase, it can lead to skin lesions, skin infections and hair loss alopecia. The severity of symptoms depends upon the type of mite inhabiting the dog.

Symptoms and Types of Demodectic Mange in Dogs Demodectic mange in dogs may either be localized, meaning that it affects only specific areas of the body, or generalized, where it affects the entire body. If localized, symptoms are usually mild, with lesions occurring in patches, especially on the face, torso or legs. If generalized, symptoms will be more widespread and appear across the body.

These symptoms include alopecia, a redness of the skin erythema and the appearance of scales and lesions. Three species of mites have been identified to cause mange in dogs. The species of mite most commonly associated with demodicosis is the Demodex canis, which inhabits the skin and hair follicles and may transfer from mother to newborn during nursing.

This means that nearly all dogs carry these mites, and very few suffer symptoms. However, when dogs have a compromised immune system, the mites can start to multiply unchecked, which leads to demodectic mange and itchy skin. Diagnosis Skin scrapings are used to find and diagnose demodicosis in dogs. Plucking hairs may also help identify the mite responsible for the condition. Alternative diagnoses may include bacterial infection in the hair follicle, other types of mange, autoimmune disease of the skin or other metabolic diseases that can affect the skin.

Treatment of Demodectic Mange in Dogs If localized, the problem is likely to resolve itself and disappear spontaneously, which happens in approximately 90 percent of cases. Females should be spayed, as fluctuations in hormones can exacerbate the disease. There are now several treatments available for dog demodectic mange. The easiest are the isoxazoline flea and tick medicine for dogs.

An older type of medication, ivermectin, is very effective but requires daily dosing until the infection is controlled. With chronic long-term cases, regular medication may be necessary. Your veterinarian will continue treatment for several weeks after there is no longer evidence of mites. Most dogs recover completely, especially if they are under 18 months, when they are diagnosed with demodectic mange. The mites are not contagious to humans or cats.

There is controversy about whether mites may transfer between dogs after the first few weeks of life. However, evidence supporting such transmission is rare. Prevention of Demodex in Dogs General good health may help prevent some cases. Dogs with generalized chronic mange should not be bred, as the condition is likely to be passed to offspring.

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Demodicosis

This mite is transmitted from the dam to offspring during suckling and is found in very small numbers on all dogs. It is believed these mites may initially cause dermatitis in dogs due to an immunologic or genetic disorder. One group is less than 2 years old at onset juvenile onset demodicosis. The other age group affected is older dogs adult onset demodicosis.

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Demodicosis (Red Mange) in Dogs

Share this: 3 min read Mange demodicosis is an inflammatory disease in dogs caused by the Demodex mite. When the number of mites inhabiting the hair follicles and skin of a dog rapidly increase, it can lead to skin lesions, skin infections and hair loss alopecia. The severity of symptoms depends upon the type of mite inhabiting the dog. Symptoms and Types of Demodectic Mange in Dogs Demodectic mange in dogs may either be localized, meaning that it affects only specific areas of the body, or generalized, where it affects the entire body. If localized, symptoms are usually mild, with lesions occurring in patches, especially on the face, torso or legs. If generalized, symptoms will be more widespread and appear across the body.

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Diagnosis[ edit ] For demodectic mange, properly performed deep skin scrapings generally allow the veterinarian to identify the microscopic mites. Acetate tape impression with squeezing has recently found to be a more sensitive method to identify mites. Recent research, however, found that the demodex mite is rarely found on clinically normal dogs, meaning that the presence of any number of mites in a sample is very likely to be significant. In breeds such as the West Highland White Terrier , relatively minor skin irritation which would otherwise be considered allergy should be carefully scraped because of the predilection of these dogs to demodectic mange. Skin scrapings may be used to follow the progress of treatment in demodectic mange.

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This sometimes occurs in dogs without an obvious underlying problem. Demodicosis can be localized or generalized. Localized demodicosis infections usually occur early in life, typically in puppies between 3 and 6 months of age. This form of of the disease is usually mild and responds well to treatment. Many cases resolve spontaneously with little or no treatment, though in some dogs it progresses to the generalized form. Generalized demodicosis is more difficult to treat and carries a more guarded prognosis. You will notice thinning hair, scaly skin, and the skin itself will appear reddish-brown and look very itchy.

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