COPYRIGHTS AND COPYWRONGS SIVA VAIDHYANATHAN PDF

Embedded within conflicts over royalties and infringement are cultural values—about race, class, access, ownership, free speech, and democracy—which influence how rights are determined and enforced. He argues persuasively that in its current punitive, highly restrictive form, American copyright law hinders cultural production, thereby contributing to the poverty of civic culture. In addition to choking cultural expression, recent copyright law, Vaidhyanathan argues, effectively sanctions biases against cultural traditions which differ from the Anglo-European model. In African-based cultures, borrowing from and building upon earlier cultural expressions is not considered a legal trespass, but a tribute. Similarly, the oral transmission of culture, which has a centuries-old tradition within African American culture, is complicated by current copyright laws.

Author:Gulabar Akinozahn
Country:Zimbabwe
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Marketing
Published (Last):21 May 2010
Pages:39
PDF File Size:9.64 Mb
ePub File Size:19.75 Mb
ISBN:887-1-60995-171-3
Downloads:22973
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Grorr



Technology has brought the copyright issue into every home in America, and the dialogue is no longer dominated by lawyers and scholars. Even my neighbor and her 17 year old son have an opinion on copyrights, music, and the nature of ideas.

Vaidhyanathan, a cultural historian, is currently an assistant professor of Culture and Communication at New York University. Vaidhyanathan has also written The Anarchist in the Library Basic Books, , which is considered a "sequel" to Copyrights and Copywrongs. The book launches with a succinct history of copyright from the early English common law, through the framing of the Constitution, taking the reader right up to the present day controversy of music sampling.

Chapter by chapter, Vaidhyanathan charts the historical movement away from the "thin" copyright ideal through creative expressions such as film, dance, writing, and music.

Furthermore, the present "thick" protection is reinforcing the notion that major corporations, studios, and business enterprises "own" much of the creative past of this country.

Twain was not only a great American author, but he was also a great American copyright adjudicator. At that time, many publishing houses in England did not have agreements with American publishers. In fact, many of the British novels found on American bookshelves in that era were infringing copies of such works. Vaidhyanathan cleverly points out that British works not only carried more intellectual value than American works, they were also cheaper in price.

Vaidhyanathan asserts, however, that Twain was "a busy, contradictory, living human being who traveled, read, and changed his views several times in his lifetime" p. Mark Twain ended up advocating a position similar to another literary figure in American history, Noah Webster. After Congress passed the first federal copyright statute, Noah Webster went on a campaign to extend the term of copyright protection.

In , the term of protection was 14 years. What Vaidhyanathan reveals is that Webster wanted perpetual copyright protection, which is similar to what Mr.

Twain advocated in his later years. Vaidhyanathan states that events Twain used in his writings were "unapologetically lifted from others" p. At a time when Helen Keller was accused of plagiarism, Twain wrote to her stating Oh, dear me, how unspeakably funny and owlishly idealistic and grotesque was that "plagiarism" farce! As if there was much of anything in any human utterance, oral or written, except plagiarism.

The kernel, the soul - let us go further and say the substance, the bulk, the actual and valuable material of all human utterances - is plagiarism. For substantially all ideas are second-hand, consciously or unconsciously drawn from a million outside sources.

The author deftly addresses the various fine points of plagiarism and piracy, and concludes that Twain was clearly a rampant plagiarist. Again, we return to the results that both Twain and Webster desired: perpetual copyright protection. With the relatively recent passage of the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act, Vaidhyanathan cleverly reveals that the present copyright laws are analogous to the perpetual copyright protection for which these two historical figures argued.

The book narrates other areas of copyright law beyond the plagiarism debate. Vaidhyanathan offers four additional chapters on the history of copyright in literature, film, and music. The author makes the content entertaining by intertwining stories of popular culture, with appearances by George Harrison, Groucho Marx, Led Zeppelin, and Pac-man, to name just a few.

The book methodically examines the creative process for literature and music, most notably an interesting chapter on folk, blues, rock, and, rap music. The reader is brought to the present age of sampling, which Vaidhyanathan points out is a new cultural expression of that tribute. These contemporary legal and quasi-legal actions clearly point to a dramatic shift in copyright policy. Furthermore, these events reveal a lack of the cultural understanding necessary for ideas and expressions to flourish in the United States.

The author also proposes an ominous vision of the United States educational and creative future, if the present notions of "ideas as property" are not opposed.

The book flows nicely and the author avoids the use of frustrating legal terminology. The chapters on music are concise, but it was difficult to really get a feel for the music infringement cases, unless the reader has heard the songs in question.

I did find an example of the songs in a lecture given by Vaidhyanathan on November 18, This book presents an engrossing history of copyright, and the author clearly summarizes his views on the adverse nature of "thin" copyright protection.

Vaidhyanathan neatly contrasts his "thin" theory with the structure currently in place, through examination of the present state of copyright, licensing and other contracts of adhesion, which prevent the free flow of ideas and information. However, one small criticism of this reviewer is that the author does not clearly state a plan of action to fight the current scheme.

While there are suggestions in the "Afterword" to read other authors or join grass roots movements such as "information commons," the lack of a well outlined, organized strategy is surprising. Maybe this was done on purpose. Even without a plan of action, this book does offer the average reader a fascinating history of copyright, plagiarism, and culture. The book is available for download in full PDF format. References Demers, J. Steal this music: How intellectual property law affects musical creativity.

Ginsburg, J. How copyright got a bad name for itself. Columbia Journal of Law and the Arts, 26, Lessig, L. The future of ideas : The fate of the commons in a connected world. New York: Random House. Notes 1. For similar viewpoints see Lessig Also, for an excellent summary of the related issues see Ginsburg Vaidhyanathan writes that Twain even stated "These object lessons should teach us that ninety-nine parts of all things that proceed from the intellect are plagiarisms, pure and simple" p.

Kyle K. In addition, Courtney lectures on intellectual property and plagiarism for the Organizational and Corporate Communication program at Emerson College in Boston, Publication date: 19 June Hosted by Michigan Publishing , a division of the University of Michigan Library. For more information please contact mpub-help umich.

VENDRAN LLUVIAS SUAVES RAY BRADBURY PDF

Copyrights and copywrongs: the rise of intellectual property and how it threatens creativity

Technology has brought the copyright issue into every home in America, and the dialogue is no longer dominated by lawyers and scholars. Even my neighbor and her 17 year old son have an opinion on copyrights, music, and the nature of ideas. Vaidhyanathan, a cultural historian, is currently an assistant professor of Culture and Communication at New York University. Vaidhyanathan has also written The Anarchist in the Library Basic Books, , which is considered a "sequel" to Copyrights and Copywrongs. The book launches with a succinct history of copyright from the early English common law, through the framing of the Constitution, taking the reader right up to the present day controversy of music sampling. Chapter by chapter, Vaidhyanathan charts the historical movement away from the "thin" copyright ideal through creative expressions such as film, dance, writing, and music. Furthermore, the present "thick" protection is reinforcing the notion that major corporations, studios, and business enterprises "own" much of the creative past of this country.

LA CASA MALDITA HP LOVECRAFT PDF

Copyrights and Copywrongs: The Rise of Intellectual Property and How It Threatens Creativity

Content uploaded by Siva Vaidhyanathan Author content All content in this area was uploaded by Siva Vaidhyanathan on May 14, Content may be subject to copyright. Today, however, copyright law is on the front page of local newspapers, argued about in conversations at the water cooler, and discussed by teenagers looking to find free music on the Web. The book highlights how copyright law has accommodated the changing ways in which information is disseminated across America. The book is well written and full of examples taken from popular culture that allow the reader to connect with the author and the underlying philosophy of copyright law. Copyrights and Copywrongs begins with an introduction to copyright law as it relates to popular culture. Instead of defining copyright in the Introduction, Vaidhyanathan questions for whom copyright is really meant.

MT8870 DTMF DECODER DATASHEET PDF

Given the fact that the author and I have similar concerns, this book was refreshing in the way that it looked at the history of law involving creations and their legal protection, pointing out the balance of concerns between allowing for some profit to original creators while also increasing what is in the public sphere to allow for the further creativity of others in such diverse areas as low-cost classic books for readers and sampling rights for rap musicians to signify over, all matters that have been threatened due to the decline of the public space of community that has taken place since the beginning of the 20th century. This short book of about pages is divided into five chapters and provides a history of copyright law as well as a rallying cry for those who are opposed to its abuse by the heirs and corporate holders of rights that originally belonged to creators. After acknowledgments and an introduction, the author begins with a look at copyright and American culture and the issues of ideas, expressions, and democracy 1. After this the author moves to a discussion of Mark Twain and his complex views on literary copyrights over the course of his career and his largely European perspective as he got older and more copyright-rich 2. The author then turns his attention to jazz and rap and the problem of copyright as it relates to music, spending a great deal of time examining self-plagiarism as well as sampling issues 4. The book then ends with a chapter on the digital moment and its threat to copyrights 5 as well as the summer without Martha Graham that resulted from disputes over the ownership of her choreography. Overall there is a great deal to celebrate about this particular book, not least the way that the author is able to wrestle with questions about the value that is gained to a society when existing creations can be reconceptualized and used as the foundation for the creativity of others.

GASPAR CASSADO SUITE FOR SOLO CELLO PDF

View Citation summary Copyright reflects far more than economic interests. He argues persuasively that in its current punitive, highly restrictive form, American copyright law hinders cultural production, thereby contributing to the poverty of civic culture. In addition to choking cultural expression, recent copyright law, Vaidhyanathan argues, effectively sanctions biases against cultural traditions which differ from the Anglo-European model. In African-based cultures, borrowing from and building upon earlier cultural expressions is not considered a legal trespass, but a tribute. Similarly, the oral transmission of culture, which has a centuries-old tradition within African American culture, is complicated by current copyright laws. How, for example, can ownership of music, lyrics, or stories which have been passed down through generations be determined?

Related Articles